Parent Site
Accounting Glencoe Online
Business Administration HomeProduct InformationSite MapSearchContact Us

 

What Does Using Computers Actually Do for
Your Child?


What Computers and the Information Superhighway CAN Do

They can help children learn skills using information resources and technology such as problem-solving, fact-gathering, analysis, and writing on computers-skills that employers will seek from future workers (today's young people). They can also help young people learn computer programming and other marketable skills.

They can open up new worlds of rich learning experiences to children through schools, libraries, and home. For example, children can work on a school project with other children in countries thousands of miles away-or gather information from and try out their ideas with renowned scientists, authors, or business leaders. And "electronic pen pals"-either relatives or new online friends-from opposite ends of the planet can e-mail* each other almost instantly. They can increase access to children who have been shut out. Children in poor or rural school districts can use online services to visit museums, cities, and wildlife preserves they would not otherwise get to see. Children with disabilities can participate more fully in learning, in art programs, and in socializing.

They can increase access to children who have been shut out. Children in poor or rural school districts can use online services to visit museums, cities, and wildlife preserves they would not otherwise get to see. Children with disabilities can participate more fully in learning, in art programs, and in socializing.


What Computers and the Information Superhighway CAN'T Do

Computer and online time alone can't make your child an honor student. Children learn best when they receive individualized attention and encouragement from teachers and parents. Every kind of technology-from the blackboard to slide presentations to cable TV in the classroom to CD-ROMs-is simply a tool whose effectiveness depends on using it well.

Computers alone won't make your child a well-rounded, successful adult. Children still need the balance that comes from outdoor activities, friends and family, solid academic skills, and healthy relationships with strong adult role models.


What Computers and the Information Superhighway MIGHT Do

They can be a way for you to spend more time with your child on educational and recreational activities. Research shows that family involvement in a child's education is one of the most important ingredients for success. Spending time online with your child can be a way to connect with what he or she is learning in school and to stay involved. Computers can also help you expose your child to information and experiences that you value.

Online technologies can also be a way for you to stay in touch with your child's teachers, school schedules, and homework assignments. Increasingly, schools are offering parents access to important school information via e-mail and online school discussion groups. This can be especially helpful for parents whose work schedules make it hard for them to meet with teachers or be at school during the school day.


So, Why Should You Care About Computers and the Information Superhighway?

First, because information literacy skills will increasingly be expected of young people. Young people fluent in information resources will likely have advantages in the workplace. Second, this new resource may hold special educational and other opportunities for your child-as the online world can bring diverse experiences to young people. And, finally, more and more children are taking the lead to get online-and need strong parental guidance to use this new medium as a rich opportunity for learning.

 


The McGraw-Hill Companies